Mr. HR
Mr. HR Recruitment Agency

RESUME WRITING TIPS

Most people do not know that a position advertised on the internet can receive over 300 resumes per advertised position!! That number doesn't even include the hoards of unsolicited resumes received weekly. That's a lot of competition. Getting in the door is today's toughest challenge.

In addition to very powerful verbiage and eye-catching design, there are a few resume basics that must be followed to generate employer attention. While these are not the only practices that apply, they are general enough to help ensure that you're on the right track.

Presentation: Proof your resume carefully for errors and have others proof it too. There should be no typos, misspellings or grammatical mistakes. Take the extra step by printing your resume on quality bond paper to give it substance.
Focus: While objective statements are usually unnecessary (either too vague or very limiting), it’s important that your resume maintain a focus. This can be done via powerful profile/summary statement and by concentrating on the relevant experiences, skills and accomplishments that relate to the industry you wish to pursue.

Focus: While objective statements are usually unnecessary (either too vague or very limiting), it's important that your resume maintain a focus. This can be done via powerful profile/summary statement and by concentrating on the relevant experiences, skills and accomplishments that relate to the industry you wish to pursue.

Experience: Listing your experience is a given, but take your experience to the next level by adding accomplishments to your daily duties. Example, if one of your responsibilities is "customer service," provide the results of particular customer service activities using action-oriented statements.

Information: Limit your information to professional relevance only. Do not include personal information (age, marital status, sex) and don't mention why you left your other positions. Employers do not care if you were let go or if the company went out of business. That's interviewing material. And NEVER mention salary information on a resume. Period.

Education: Provide the name and location of the school and type of degree/major. High school is not necessary, but internships may be helpful if relevant. Don't forget to include any professional development activities such as seminars or specialized training. If you've been in the workforce for 5 years or more, the actual date is not necessary, nor is your GPA…your experience is what matters at this point in your career.

Page Length: No longer is it considered mandatory to have a one-page resume. As long as the information provides VALUE to the reader (not fluff), is relevant to your career goal and you have at least 5 years of experience under your belt, don't worry about length. Naturally, you don't need to write a book if you have a 30-year career, so focus on the most recent 10-12 years or so.

References: The standard statement of "References Available upon Request" is not necessary. However, if the placement of the comment balances out the resume presentation, feel free to include it. Don't, however, incorporate references on the resume itself or send a reference list with the resume. Employers aren't ready for that at this stage of the game.

Project List: if you have any sort of project list or portfolio of your work, feel free to add it as an attachment. These additional Materials always helps to evaluate your skill level and qualifications.